So Tell Me About Roatan

bay islands, Honduras
In red, you see the location of Roatan.

Today’s post is in honor of Roatan, Honduras. Many people ask, so why Roatan? Many even ask what Roatan is. Roatan is an island off of Honduras part of the Bay Island chain. The people are kind, the weather is warm and lovely, the sand is white, and the water is crystal clear.

I was mystified when I visited for the first time in 2012. Everything about this place was perfect. Some personal luxuries I enjoyed included attractive men and delicious smoothies from Earth Mama Roatan.

Along with my personal enjoyment, I was a bit taken aback by the living conditions. The island was very impoverished, and that’s what sparked my need to help.

Some statistics about Roatan…

  • Honduras is the second poorest country in Central America and has recently been declared a 4th world country.
  • Most of its citizens live off approximately $1 a day, and have limited access to education that exceeds the 6th grade.
  • Roatan itself has recently become a tourist destination due to the fact that it is almost entirely surrounded by the second largest barrier reef in the world, but the Islanders themselves rarely see any of the profit generated as most of the resorts and beaches that the tourists visit are entirely run by foreigners.
  •  Because Roatan is so far off of the coast of Honduras, the Islanders have very limited access to the medical facilities
  • young children die of preventable and treatable sicknesses
  • Most every young child has been through a bout of worms, most more than once in their lives. No child should ever die from worms, but it happens on the island.
  • The HIV/AIDS rate is the highest in Central America.  The rate of HIV in Roatan is 220 times the rate of HIV in the U.S.

These statistics devastate me, and that is why I have chosen Roatan as a main location for help. So if you get a chance to visit, not only take advantage of its gorgeous features, but aid its deprived people.

Collar Loving

Although it is spring, it's still a bit chilly in my town so here is a transitional outfit featuring my denim collar

Along with this denim collar, I wore my wildlife headband.

Along with this denim collar, I wore my wildlife headband.Closeup

Today was a transition day so I stayed a bit more wintery with my outfit. I was just out and about to Target. The main focus is the denim collar. This is a handmade piece made from a pair of old acid washed jeans. The collar is removable, and attaches by a suede tie. It’s a very versatile piece and great for any season! each collar varies in denim wash and are for sale on my Etsy shop for $12.50.

Buy it here https://www.etsy.com/listing/127825731/distressed-denim-attachable-collar?ref=shop_home_active

Roatan Children’s Fund Supplies Drive

Here is a photo of my surrounded by all the supplies I collected in 2012!

Here is a photo of my surrounded by all the supplies I collected in 2012!

 Today, I am going to tell you about what first got me interested in forming this organization.

After visiting Honduras, I fell in love and came home wanting to help out. A school project came up where I had to note a challenge and try to fix it. This was the perfect opportunity for me to help out. After months of planning, I started a supplies drive. I collected mainly school supplies and nonperishable foods. After I gained a huge amount of supplies from my school drive, I went to my local target and picked up a few fun things for the kids that weren’t donated by others.

There were the flyers hung around my school during the drive.

There were the flyers hung around my school during the drive.

After a series of emails with the organization head, Lynn, I was ready to ship. The shipping process was intensive, which included various forms and packing techniques.

The final collected supplies that was being sent to Honduras totaled over 500 dollars. I was amazed, and hopeful about my community.

I was honored to participate in this project, and it inspired me to start Little Known Help Zone, which focuses on many Central American charities and projects.

 Visit Roatan Children’s Fund at www.roatanchildrensfund.com